We have an obligation to serve the poor and the homeless

Comment from a Reader 

I have a neighbor who retired at age 40, and she has seen the world as you have. She does humanitarian work, but most of it does not involve the homeless and the poor, for those are the ugly pictures, the ones which cry out for your help, elderly bagging groceries, and little children who know only that they are uncomfortable, for mothers know nothing about grooming them.

I only wish to know who takes care of the majority of the world when we all go out into the kingdoms made for those who flee from one adventure to the other.

We do have an obligation to serve the poor and the homeless.

How does this fit in to your quest?

Barbara

Hi Barbara,

Thanks for taking the time to write.

It is our perspective that becoming financially independent is one of the best things we can do for ourselves and the world.

When we are no longer enslaved to our paycheck with the corresponding pressures to maintain a job to pay our bills, we have the time and the finances to give back.

Each person is able to give according to their skills. Perhaps one person has the talent to invent a product to assist mankind in one form or another. Maybe someone else dedicates their time installing clean water in villages that don’t have it. Another teaches English so that the local poor can move up in the world and bring their knowledge and income back to their village. Other people spend their time educating young women who are known to go back to their village and uplift, teach, or mentor other young girls… and the entire village benefits.

There are countless ways to volunteer and to give back.  Medically trained people donate their time and expertise for free to those in need – as was done in our previous home base of Panajachel, Guatemala. Those who are trained in horticulture are helping locals plant sustainable crops. Others offer mini-loans to help small business people (many of them women) to get started so they can purchase shoes, clothing and school supplies for their children.

We are aware of so many of these things happening as we seem them in our travels.

I’m unclear of what has formulated your perspective – thinking that “people” don’t give enough to the poor or homeless… Many good things are happening all around the world — all the time.

Besides volunteering ourselves (instructing, mentoring, building, supporting those in need) we make a point of disseminating information so others can volunteer in their retirement time. We connect people to projects often, and we publish what we can about certain projects that are making a difference in people’s lives.

We encourage those who are leaving the working world to create a life of meaning in their retirement, not just spending their time in endless rounds of golf or bridge.

I am proud of what we do, of how we give back, and am amazed at the quality of people we have met who are supporting those in need…

It is my hope for you that you, too, will experience the exhilaration and satisfaction of giving back – whether it is in your own home town and neighborhood or if you travel to some faraway land.

Sending my best,

Akaisha

About Retire Early Lifestyle

Billy and Akaisha Kaderli retired two decades ago at the age of 38 and began traveling the world. As recognized retirement experts and internationally published authors on topics of finance and world travel, they have been interviewed about retirement issues by The Wall Street Journal, Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine, The Motley Fool Rule Your Retirement newsletter, nationally syndicated radio talk shows and countless newspapers and TV shows nationally and worldwide. They wrote the popular books The Adventurer's Guide to Early Retirement and Your Retirement Dream IS Possible.
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