Chile’s Dramatic Coastline

To Billy’s dismay, I’m not much of a sailor on wide open seas. However I can easily do rivers, lakes, motorboats, cruise ships and ferries in protected areas. This is great news if we ever wanted to take advantage of the many chile tours that are offered. Large, stable ferry boats cruise through the mass of Chile’s islands, channels and fjords. And the only way to see this distinctively beautiful scenery is by boat.

The weather in this area of Chile is predominately rain with annual rainfall measuring from between 6 and 13 feet! But nature’s lighting against the backdrop of immense glaciers, mountains and icebergs create dramatic and unforgettable scenery. One of the tours makes a stop in a small Chilean hamlet with a population of under 200 and is one of Chile’s most isolated inhabited places on par with Easter Island and Villa Las Estrellas. This village is known for being the home of the last Kaweshkar people and is only accessible by sea. Curiously, the small town has no roads, only pedestrian boardwalks that connect the shops and houses.

If booking a tour through this memorable and striking scenery appeals to your sense of adventure, why not take a few moments and do a bit of research? You could have all of your questions answered as to what to pack and how much a tour would cost. Then you could spend your time looking forward to seeing some of the planet’s most notable scenery.

About Retire Early Lifestyle

Billy and Akaisha Kaderli retired two decades ago at the age of 38 and began traveling the world. As recognized retirement experts and internationally published authors on topics of finance and world travel, they have been interviewed about retirement issues by The Wall Street Journal, Kiplinger's Personal Finance Magazine, The Motley Fool Rule Your Retirement newsletter, nationally syndicated radio talk shows and countless newspapers and TV shows nationally and worldwide. They wrote the popular books The Adventurer's Guide to Early Retirement and Your Retirement Dream IS Possible.
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